Making the world a smaller place

Tuesday 27th June, 2017

 

After more than a decade teaching, Brandon Fuga spent the past two year’s at OneSchool’s Glenvale. In that time the legal studies and humanities teacher has notice many great qualities about the school, but community participation gets a special mention.

“The community involvement stands out to me,” he says. “Parents get involved in other schools, but nothing like OneSchool. If we need parent help for an excursion or school event, help arrives with no questions ask. It makes running the campus so much easier and enjoyable.”

Another plus is that because OneSchool is a national and global school, he gets to meet not only students from other states, but also other countries, something that other schools don’t get to experience within the same community feel.

“In the last few months we have had visitors from England, Adelaide and other Glenvale campuses,” he says. “Conversations about students and the way we do things are familiar. It’s great that students in Australia and over the other side of the world follow the same expectations and share similar experiences.  It really makes the world a smaller place.”

OneSchool teaching methods such as Video Conferencing and Self-Directed Learning were also new. As well as being a new method of teaching, it put a new emphasis on why he teaches and made him realise how important his role is.

“VC has made me think about how I present the curriculum and engage students,” says Brandon. “I understand a student a remote campus relies on my expertise and teacher professionalism. I always think that if I wasn’t teaching this student, they wouldn’t be able to learn the subject, so my teaching is important. SDL is interesting and I think it needs time to be further developed. The idea of students doing more student centered curriculum is exciting and pioneering in education.”

This is backed up by his thoughts on how important it is for students to think on their feet and how this also leads to other qualities that prepare them for life after school. Parents also play their part in this respect, too.

“I truly believe the students need to learn how to be independent and learn leadership in a school environment,” he says. “I have seen the benefits of students helping run the campus and organise events. When they are given the opportunity, the sky’s the limit.

“Parents are fully supportive of campus initiatives and trust the professional judgement of teachers and Head of Campus.  This is important as it means the community and teachers work together to achieve outcomes.  At the end of the day, we share the common interest of children’s education and personal growth through education.”